Saturday, May 28, 2016

A Tale Of Two Banquets

Over the course of this decade, as my collecting interests have moved more and more toward Topps Chewing Gum, the company (as compared to the cards they sold) I've accumulated a few old PR photos of various events, many of which have appeared on this blog over the years.  Two of my favorites are from the Topps All Star Rookie banquets, which were held from 1959-66 (and thereafter renamed the Baseball Achievement Awards, which continue on to this day).

The first picture has a mysterious element to it as I cannot identify two of the dais-sitters nor the year of the event:


Tilting rightward from the lectern, we have a waiter laying out rolls (the butter is already on the table), Sy Berger of course, then a gentleman who looks familiar to me but I can't identify, Shag Shaughnessy, Joe Garagiola (the ever-present MC for these events), and finally another unidentified man.  The banner behind the dais portrays a generic All Star Rookie Trophy and reads:

TOPPS
All Star Rookie
Young America's Favorite

As we can see here, the players name, team, position and year would be engraved as well, thanks to an offering from Lelands awhile back:


I'm not certain there was always such a large wood component in all years and have to confess I never realized the ballplayer icon stands atop well, a top hat!

Friend o'the Archive Keith Olbermann thinks the dating would be no later than 1962 based upon how Joe Garagiola looks. I can state it's not from 1966 as the setting was different for that luncheon, namely the Hotel Americana in NYC:


That dais has no mysterious element at all, except maybe what kind of cheese was being served. Even if it wasn't obvious to me who was who, the back is helpfully captioned:


It's also not the 1960 Banquet.  As Mr. Olbermann helpfully pointed out, the 1961 program has some photos of the 1960 event, which was held at the Hotel Manhattan. Here Joel Shorin is presenting MC Joe Garagiola with an oversized 1960 Topps card they created especially for the occasion:


Below,  Shag Shaugnessy is presenting a trophy to pitcher Al Cicotte, who was the Topps Rookie Player of the Year for 1960. Cicotte went on to have a mediocre major league career and his biggest claim to fame turned out to be his lineage: he was the grand nephew of Black Sox pitched Ed Cicotte. Shag was an integral part of the selection committee and retired as President of the International League in 1960.  Did you know he's a member of the Canadian Football Hall of Fame?


Here's the 1960 All Star Rookie selections:


I can also state it's not the 1963 Banquet, which had a different banner (Fifth Annual). It's also not from 1959 despite there being no mention of the annual progression on the banner but maybe they did not show it each year. The 1959 luncheon was held at the Hotel Manhattan.

So we have a checklist of sorts for the annual luncheon honoring the All Star Rookies:

1959 Hotel Manhattan
1960 Hotel Manhattan
1966 Hotel Americana
????  Waldorf-Astoria 

If anyone has thoughts on the first picture's mystery subjects and can confirm the year of the event, I'm all ears!

Saturday, May 21, 2016

Secondary To None

You think you've seen it all when it come to strange Topps offerings, right?  From gubernatorial candidates to baseball commissioners to little kids who won a contest, over the years Topps has put out some strange ones.  While it's nothing now for them to reel off a single subject printing (same day even) or a small set designed for a specific purpose such as the 1964 Rookie Banquet, before the dawn of digital photography and graphics software it used to take a lot of design and production work to do so. Yet they constantly did this right into the modern digital age.

In 1989 Topps made what is known in the financial world as a secondary offering of their stock. What that means is either an existing public company issued more shares of stock to raise additional capital or that current shareholders offered for sale, as a group, some of their existing shares.

The first Topps stock sale was, obviously, when they went public:



It's involved but Topps Chewing Gum redeemed all of its outstanding preferred stock (3,150 Series A shares and 4,157 B shares) on April 27, 1972, which represented the shares that were privately and primarily held by directors of the Company (mostly the Shorin family). The next day they did a 380-for-1 stock split of their common stock, ownership of which was still held within the company. Five million shares of common stock were priced at 10 cents a share a then retroactively applied back to February 28, 1971.

On March 3, 1973 100,000 shares of common stock were reserved for future stock options to be granted by the company. This was done to align with the Topps fiscal year from what I can make out. Eventually 60,000 shares of common stock were offered in an IPO on June 15, 1972. I would call Topps Chewing Gum a closely held public company as of that date.

You can see that Joel Shorin signed (or had his signature reproduced) as President and Louis Walker did the same as Treasurer, Agent and Registrar. Manufacturers Hanover Trust, the Shorin's longtime bank dating back to the founding of the American Leaf Tobacco Company in 1908, was the transfer agent, meaning they handled all stock transactions. Here's Louis now, standing in front of an ancient data storage system that could probably fit on my cell phone with room to spare:


Also of interest is the corporate seal:


Those of you who have been reading this blog or my book know that Topps was founded in 1938, incorporated briefly and then unincorporated around the start of World War 2, likely to avoid public scrutiny of their plans to buy up struggling candy companies due to looming sugar quotas. They then reincorporated following the death of their patriarch Morris Shorin in 1947.

Topps went private again in 1984 in a Leveraged Buy Out and subsequently reincorporated in Delaware. By 1987, wanting to take advantage of the roaring bull market, they went public again, only to watch the stock market come crashing down in October of that year. I lose the thread a bit after that but in 1989, with Upper Deck joining a host of competitors, Topps made a secondary offering of common stock. 2.5 million shares were underwritten by Alex. Brown & Sons and to commemorate this event, Topps created a set of cards featuring the financial gurus who put the deal together. Thanks to the recently concluded REA auction, we can take a look at these cards, featuring the ABS team:



There are some really ill-fitting caps in some shots-yikes! I do like how they kept the 1989 Baseball design intact though. And I doubt you could use full MLB uniforms on such cards today but it was a simpler time back then.

The backs give a little biographical detail for each subject:


Here's one that caught my eye, sorry it's a little blurry:


I have to say "Mouthpiece" is a pretty awesome nickname!  My enthusiasm though, was dampened considerably upon reading that Mr. Greer's hobbies are "Investment Banking and other games of chance."  Dude.......

I actually own a share of Topps stock, although it's long since been rendered worthless as the issue was redeemed some time ago.  I think these were issued with collectors in mind given the par value but can't quite recall. 1994 seems to be the year of issuance:


Arthur Shorin was Chairman at the time. Nice to see the Shorin's kept their historical banking institution in the mix (Chemical Bank merged with Manufacturers Hanover in 1991).

A long overdue tip o' the cap to Dale Beaumont for arranging that I get that share!

Saturday, May 14, 2016

Leisure Suits Them

Topps had all sorts of creative ways to save money in the golden olden days, from repackaging unsold product and reselling it to having the Card Collectors Company sell overstock and returns that even the most wonderfully designed repackaging couldn't move. Topps even continued to use up stationery items with old logos and x'ing out information on their letterhead.  But one of their best ideas in this vein involved letting their athletes under contract select merchandise from a catalog instead of getting a check each time the signed or renewed.

After Sy Berger was hired in 1947 he used connections he had from his Army days to start procuring cheap trinkets for the Bazooka premiums Topps would unceasingly offer on their comics. Topps took that practice and just extended it to the athletes that comprised their sports offerings. Originally just offered to baseball players, likely beginning in 1957 (more on that in a New York minute), the process would become quite robust in later years. Thanks to a recent spin through eBay, I can give you a peek at how it all worked.

Here is the 1973/74 Gift Catalog that Topps gave to all their subjects:



The dating of this one (by the way, nice graphics!) and the fact this was the 17th edition allowed me to guesstimate the first year of the catalog. Counting backwards you get 1957/58 as a starting point, a date which makes a lot of sense. In their earliest years of signing ballplayers to contracts (beginning in 1950) cash was king. Things must have changed with the purchase of Bowman. Since Topps purchased their main competitor from Connelly Containers in early 1956 it would have taken them a little time to get the first catalog going. Topps was producing football cards by this time (and would dabble with basketball before relaunching hockey) but the first two or three years of football were procured by a deal with the league and not the individual players. I suspect it was the same with the NBA (and NHL two years prior).

As a bonus we also get a glimpse of the payments athletes could expect in 1973: $250 when they signed and an extra $75 as an "extension bonus", which must have functioned like the soon-to-be obsolete reserve clause in Major League Baseball contracts.

Some of the offered merchandise is a hoot:




I especially like the Deluxe Nusauna and the Diving Lung!  The former strikes as something from a Three Stooges movie and the latter would be used for a type of activity that must have scared various team executives to death. But back to the money saving part-Topps could use retail prices when they probably got things at wholesale (or less)! Pretty sweet deal, no?

Topps had a system to keep track of the payments that also gives us a little more insight.  This Jim Palmer file card I swiped from Jon over at the the Fleer Sticker Project blog tells the tale:


There is a ton of good information on here.  You can see how Jim reached his initial milestone to be paid by Topps (30 days on the roster had to go by first) during the 1965 season and he was dutifully immortalized in 1966.  You can see his card number and how he pooled his earliest "points" to buy a console TV (a big deal back in the day) but was filling out the den with a pool table by 1974. And perhaps most intriguingly, he was actually giving Topps money to complete some transactions! So Topps had a wholesale cost basis that would be "topped out" at retail if a player was short on time and wanted a big ticket item.  Nice!

In The Great American Baseball Card, Flipping, Trading and Bubble Gum Book, there is a great section in the front about operations at Topps right around the time the above gift catalog was issued. Sy Berger is quoted as saying "This year each guy will end up with about $400." There was also a royalty agreement described that sweetened the pot a little which I guess is how he got to $400 a man.

In 1973 or 1974 you were dealing with roughly 600 ballplayers assuming most of them were on an extension, Topps would have to shell out around two hundred and fifty grand at a time when wax packs went for a dime. According to Sy though, most players liked the process. He went on to say in the book "Richie Allen took a new refrigerator this year....Dick Green bought some farm machinery with his. And Al Kaline just bought his kid a new car."

I would love to know what kind of car was offered but I don't have any more interior pages to look through right now. Boy, times were different back then, huh?.

Saturday, May 7, 2016

Product 19

It looks like we finally have resolution on the subject count for the 1971 Topps Winners set, covered here often but most recently here. The checklist jumped from 15 to 19 subjects a little over two years ago when I received what looked like spy camera versions of four new subjects. That count looks to be entirely correct as a proof sheet scan has working it's way to me from the same source as last time.

I think you'll agree there are 19 cards in the full set after looking at this:



The contest that led to these cards being produced offered 25 winners their own cards.  Distribution of the contest boxes, which were specially marked by Topps, and the close proximity of some of the the hometowns of the winners makes it clear only a select few areas even got a chance to enter as random chance would not yield the geographic concentrations seen.  I suspect, based upon this odd distribution, Topps was running some kind of test or survey in the areas of distribution to see if a contest would increase sales. I'm guessing the results were not what they wanted since they could not fill out a full slate of winners.  And let us not forget the Bole sisters. A large, random contest would probably not see two sisters each win.  Maybe their Mom or Dad made a good case for them to both be included!

The sheet has the backs so it looks like a final process:


Cards from this set have been going for big bucks after being essentially ignored for years.  I don't see that they have made the PSA Registry but no doubt attempts are being made to have the set included.

This likely ends the saga of this strange set.  I'm happy I was able to suss a lot of its secrets out over the years.

Saturday, April 30, 2016

Letters Perfect

A couple of items from the real Topps Archives today kids!

First out of the gate is a letter quite a few small fry would have received from Topps if they had written in to try and get a few baseball cards to complete their sets:


Sy Berger and his secretary are shown as the Reference Initials but Sy did not sign these letters, they just went out like this, maybe sometimes with an inside address and date. These were printed up in advance, my copy does not have typewriter key impressions, although the Topps Chewing Gum logo and contact information is embossed. Dating is tough but pre-1963 I would say, given the lack of a ZIP code and it seems likely it's from the early 60's.

Dating is not an issue for this next item, which is an internal memo that details a panoply of Topps bigwigs and their secretaries:



The bast part of this memo is that Woody Gelman annotated it (his handwriting is quite distinctive) so it could be filed away in an internal reference book. I don't have the attachments unfortunately but can guess that nos. 906 and 907 are rak and cello configurations, while item 988 is probably related to wax. Of course, I could be completely wrong!

Topps had clear delineations between their direct retail accounts and their jobbers (wholesalers) and in fact different unions handled shipments for each of these.  In addition there were tobacco and confectionery jobbers that were also solicited differently.

For you young 'uns, an addressograph was a way to address mailings using a machine of the same name.  It was quite the cumbersome process and you can read more about it here if you like.

The memo itself was a ditto, likely made on a spirit duplicator.  Those of us over a certain age can conjure up the smell of these immediately upon seeing one. It was pure methyl alcohol, by the way, that let off that smell so all you third graders back in the day were getting high every time you sniffed quiz papers!

All of this was a labor intensive process and when you start connecting the dots, you realize just how much product Topps had to move to make a profit.

Saturday, April 23, 2016

1969 Is Fine - Part Three

Continuing on in the magical year of 1969, today we take a peek at Topps Super Baseball, one of the first Topps "premium" sets (in the "high value" sense of the word). It's been discussed here before but given the canvass of the Topps baseball issues we've been working on here at the Topps Archives Research Complex another look is certainly in order.



I won't get into the specifics on the backs (been there, done that) but do want to look at potential printing dates. Given the fact 1969 was an expansion year with four new teams added in one season for the first time, Topps did a great job keeping things straight in this set, especially compared to the Decal and Deckle inserts that appeared this year.

However, thanks to a specific transaction, the dating of the set is fairly easy. On April 25, 1969  Dick Selma was traded by the Padres to the Cubs.



Given the (almost) alphabetical ordering of the set (by teams in each league and then players on each squad) it's easy to figure out Selma was to have been a Padre in the set. So the set was composed before the trade date of April 25th for sure.  In terms of a start date, I have to think it was after the Decals and 4-on 1's were created, given the lack of anarchy in Super Baseball. Selma, who was numbered one behind his fellow Padre Ollie Brown in the set, likely replaced somebody else whose name preceded Brown's. Based upon their expansion draft picks and active roster for the season, only three players are possible: Jose Arcia, Steve Arlin and Jack Baldschun.

Arcia was a light hitting utility man with one season in the majors when the Padres selected him in the expansion draft.  No way it was him.  Arlin was taken in the same draft but had never pitched in the majors before he debuted in '69, so it wasn't him either. Baldschun was released by the Reds before the start of the season and  on April 12, 1969 was signed by San Diego. He stuck with the team for the entire season and could have been the other intended Padre.  I'm guessing Topps had slotted him in then found they had no suitable photo of him (the set showing only certain poses) so they grabbed whatever was handy, namely a shot of Selma.  That puts a potential two week window in early April on the table, assuming my guess work on Selma is right.  If not and it was just a screw up, then early March seems likely to me.

(UPDATE 4/24/16: Friend o'the Archive Keith Olbermann has pointed out the trade of Joe Torre to St. Louis from Atlanta on March 17th marks an earlier lock in date and the Mickey Mantle retirement announcement of March 1st may push this back to February at the latest. At least I'm consistent, the longer I run an arc, then more screwups I make!) 

No matter, it's a great set.  Here's a checklist in team order for you all.  Note how Kansas City is out of order as they should precede Minnesota:

No.
First Name
Last Name
Team
1
McNALLY
DAVE
BALTIMORE ORIOLES
2
ROBINSON
FRANK
BALTIMORE ORIOLES
3
ROBINSON
BROOKS
BALTIMORE ORIOLES
4
HARRELSON
KEN
BOSTON RED SOX
5
YASTRZEMSKI
CARL
BOSTON RED SOX
6
CULP
RAY
BOSTON RED SOX
7
FREGOSI
JIM
CALIFORNIA ANGELS
8
REICHARDT
RICK
CALIFORNIA ANGELS
9
DAVALILLO
VIC
CALIFORNIA ANGELS
10
APARICIO
LUIS
CHICAGO WHITE SOX
11
WARD
PETE
CHICAGO WHITE SOX
12
HORLEN
JOEL
CHICAGO WHITE SOX
13
TIANT
LUIS
CLEVELAND INDIANS
14
McDOWELL
SAM
CLEVELAND INDIANS
15
CARDENAL
JOSE
CLEVELAND INDIANS
16
HORTON
WILLIE
DETROIT TIGERS
17
McLAIN
DENNY
DETROIT TIGERS
18
FREEHAN
BILL
DETROIT TIGERS
19
KILLEBREW
HARMON
MINNESOTA TWINS
20
OLIVA
TONY
MINNESOTA TWINS
21
CHANCE
DEAN
MINNESOTA TWINS
22
FOY
JOE
KANSAS CITY ROYALS
23
NELSON
ROGER
KANSAS CITY ROYALS
24
MANTLE
MICKEY
NEW YORK YANKEES
25
STOTTLEMYRE
MEL
NEW YORK YANKEES
26
WHITE
ROY
NEW YORK YANKEES
27
MONDAY
RICK
OAKLAND ATHLETICS
28
JACKSON
REGGIE
OAKLAND ATHLETICS
29
CAMPANERIS
BERT
OAKLAND ATHLETICS
30
HOWARD
FRANK
WASHINGTONS SENATORS
31
PASCUAL
CAMILO
WASHINGTONS SENATORS
32
DAVIS
TOMMY
SEATTLE PILOTS
33
MINCHER
DON
SEATTLE PILOTS
34
AARON
HANK
ATLANTA BRAVES
35
ALOU
FELIPE
ATLANTA BRAVES
36
TORRE
JOE
ATLANTA BRAVES
37
JENKINS
FERGIE
CHICAGO CUBS
38
SANTO
RON
CHICAGO CUBS
39
WILLIAMS
BILLY
CHICAGO CUBS
40
HELMS
TOMMY
CINCINNATI REDS
41
ROSE
PETE
CINCINNATI REDS
42
MORGAN
JOE
HOUSTON ASTROS
43
WYNN
JIM
HOUSTON ASTROS
44
BLEFARY
CURT
HOUSTON ASTROS
45
DAVIS
WILLIE
LOS ANGELES DODGERS
46
DRYSDALE
DON
LOS ANGELES DODGERS
47
HALLER
TOM
LOS ANGELES DODGERS
48
STAUB
RUSTY
MONTREAL EXPOS
49
WILLS
MAURY
MONTREAL EXPOS
50
JONES
CLEON
NEW YORK METS
51
KOOSMAN
JERRY
NEW YORK METS
52
SEAVER
TOM
NEW YORK METS
53
ALLEN
RICHIE
PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES
54
SHORT
CHRIS
PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES
55
ROJAS
COOKIE
PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES
56
ALOU
MATTY
PITTSBURGH PIRATES
57
BLASS
STEVE
PITTSBURGH PIRATES
58
CLEMENTE
ROBERTO
PITTSBURGH PIRATES
59
FLOOD
CURT
ST. LOUIS CARDINALS
60
GIBSON
BOB
ST. LOUIS CARDINALS
61
McCARVER
TIM
ST. LOUIS CARDINALS
62
SELMA
DICK
SAN DIEGO PADRES
63
BROWN
OLLIE
SAN DIEGO PADRES
64
MARICHAL
JUAN
SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS
65
MAYS
WILLIE
SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS
66
McCOVEY
WILLIE
SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS

Saturday, April 16, 2016

1969 Is Fine - Part Two

Following last weeks' peek at the 1969 Decals,  today I'll be looking at the 1969 Topps Baseball Mini Stickers, more commonly known as 4 on 1 Stickers

Topps was pretty big on putting a "quad" of stickers on a card back in the 60's and early 70's, especially on the non-sports side. For some reason they decided to test a baseball themed mini sticker set in 1969, taking images from the 2nd series press sheet used for the regular issue. Perhaps Woody Gelman just liked the card design for '69! As an aside, the Football stamp stickers Topps issued in 1969, which had to be moistened to put into a mini album, are referred to as 4 in 1 Stickers. This makes me think it was more expensive to use true sticker stock but I digress....



In addition to the old standby of capless photos, Topps really broke out the airbrush in '69.  Kosco had come over to the Dodgers from the Yankees and Ollie Brown was, of course, selected in the expansion draft by the Padres (from the Giants) and had the honor of being the first player selected in MLB's third such crapshoot. Jim Bunning came over after the 1967 season from the Phillies to the Pirates and given his Philly duds, I would say Topps just didn't have a current picture of him. 

As Friend o'the Archive Keith Olbermann recently pointed out to me, Topps was facing a Major League Baseball Players Association boycott in 1967-68 and only a handful of new pictures were taken during that time.  Dexter Press and few other issuers tried to take advantage of this interregnum but the MLBPA worked out their differences with Topps after increased royalties were obtained for the players. They did start taking a lot of new photos in spring training in 1969 as a lot of tired old shots had been rehashed ad nauseum over the previous years.

Ron Reed was happily ensconced in Atlanta at the time, although he had been a player with the Detroit Pistons in the NBA  a couple of years prior. In addition to being one of a dozen MLB players who also played in the NBA/NBL, he played alongside former White Sox pitcher Dave DeBusschere while in Detroit and, in fact, was also coached by Double D, who was Pistons head coach from 1964-67!  In addition to dying on my 15th wedding anniversary, DeBusschere was also having a drink with an acquaintance of mine on the day he passed.  Anyhoo...

Topps indicia adorns the lower right card sticker of each quad, so 25 of these babies have such markings. The back is just a shade off true white:



Looks like the horizontal score line had a bit more oomph behind it during manufacture as you can't see the vertical companion.

I'll get into the teams and composition of the set momentarily, but one interesting variation from the regular issue Baseball set surfaces and gives us a window into the production timeline.

Clayton Dalrymple, shown with the Phillies in this set, while he has a team variation in the main set, having been traded from the Phillies to the Orioles on January 20, 1969. Here's the progression:





So at what point did Topps make him an Oriole?  We saw last time out that the Decals were composed sometime between 12/12/68 and 1/22/69 and the Mini Stickers fall into the same rough time frame. Once again Donn Clendenon helps with the dating. Remember he went through a crazy period where, as Wikipedia tells us:

"With first base prospect Al Oliver waiting in the wings, the Pirates left Clendenon unprotected for the 1968 Major League Baseball expansion draft, and he was selected by the Montreal Expos. On January 22, 1969, the Expos traded Clendenon and Jesús Alou to the Houston Astros for Rusty Staub. The Astros had recently hired Clendenon's former Pirates manager, Harry Walker, with whom Clendenon had a personality clash, to steer their club. Clendenon refused to report to his new team.
The Expos and Astros worked out a new deal, and Clendenon joined the Expos on April 19, 1969."

He's an Expo in the 4 on 1's It's easy to pinpoint the bookend dates for the Mini Stickers then. They couldn't have been approved for final design before October 14, 1968 (the day Clendenon was selected by the Expos from Pittsburgh) or after January 20, 1969 when Clay Dalrymple became an Oriole. Clendenon's regular issue card with the Expos shown also goes for about ten times the Houston version, while Dalrymple has many more Orioles cards available so the first regular issue print run was altered and subsequent runs had the majority of both player's cards with their new teams. I think it's good bet then that the Mini Stickers were printed just after the first run of the second series was composed.
A color process proof of the Mini Stickers exists and was auctioned for a song by REA a little while back:

These were taken from the "A" sheet, or left side of a 264 master uncut series 2 sheet, as iPhoned by Friend o'the Archive Anthony Nex; Clendenon as an Expo is third card in on rows 1 and 9, while Dalrymple is eight cards over on the 6th row:


You can clearly see how the top two rows of the regular press sheet are double printed and reappear near the bottom.  The rightmost column was excised for the Mini Stickers, which saved Topps from having checklists appear in the set but truncated the World Series subset by one subject in sticker form.  In fact, where else can you find a checklist of the cards NOT replicated as stickers?  Witness:
107  2nd Series Checklist
155  Pete Ward (White Sox)
167  World Series Game 6
172  Jerry Stephenson (Red Sox)
182  Bill Rigney (Angels)
183  Don Shaw (Expos)
211  Galen Cisco (Royals)
212  Tom Tresh (Yankees)
214  3rd Series Checklist
217  John Donaldson (Athletics)

Here's the "B" Sheet, from an old Huggins & Scott auction:

You can see how Topps sliced and diced the rows when compared to the "A" sheet.  That's how they rolled back then! If you count from the top down, the 8th and 9th rows, which are replicated as the 11th and 12th rows, are all extra prints, appearing three times over the two half sheets.
As with the 1969 Decals, I'll give you a checklist ordered by team.  Note all the of the designated rookie cards have two players apiece but I've shown each player individually:
LAST FIRST TEAM REG #
REICHARDT RICK ANGELS 205
RODGERS BOB ANGELS 157
WEAVER JIM ANGELS 134
BAUER HANK ATHLETICS 124
NOSSEK JOE ATHLETICS 143
ODOM JOHN ATHLETICS 195
AARON TOMMIE BRAVES 128
BRITTON JIM BRAVES 154
HARRIS LUMAN BRAVES 196
MILLAN FELIX BRAVES 210
REED RON BRAVES 177
GIBSON BOB CARDINALS 200
HUNTZ STEVE CARDINALS 136
NELSON MEL CARDINALS 181
PINSON VADA CARDINALS 160
SHANNON MIKE CARDINALS 110
TORREZ MIKE CARDINALS 136
BECKERT GLENN CUBS 171
DUROCHER LEO CUBS 147
HANDS BILL CUBS 115
SMITH WILLIE CUBS 198
FAIRLY RON DODGERS 122
KOSCO ANDY DODGERS 139
LEFEBVRE JIM DODGERS 140
PURDIN JOHN DODGERS 161
SUTTON DON DODGERS 216
BATEMAN JOHN EXPOS 138
CLENDENON DONN EXPOS 208
FAIREY JIM EXPOS 117
GIBBON JOE GIANTS 158
HIATT JACK GIANTS 204
MAYS WILLIE GIANTS 190
SADECKI RAY GIANTS 125
EDWARDS JOHNNY HOUSTON 186
GILSON HAL HOUSTON 156
McFADDEN LEON HOUSTON 156
RADER DOUG HOUSTON 119
WILSON DON HOUSTON 202
ALVIS MAX INDIANS 145
AZCUE JOE INDIANS 176
SNYDER RUSS INDIANS 201
WILLIAMS STAN INDIANS 118
CARDWELL DON METS 193
COLLINS KEVIN METS 127
HENDLEY BOB METS 144
MARTIN J.C. METS 112
DILLMAN BILL ORIOLES 141
JOHNSON DAVEY ORIOLES 203
MAY DAVE ORIOLES 113
PHOEBUS TOM ORIOLES 185
BROWN OLLIE PADRES 149
McCOOL BILL PADRES 129
PENA ROBERTO PADRES 184
SELMA DICK PADRES 197
CALLISON JOHNNY PHILLIES 133
DALRYMPLE CLAY PHILLIES 151
HISLE LARRY PHILLIES 206
JACKSON GRANT PHILLIES 174
LERSCH BARRY PHILLIES 206
WISE RICK PHILLIES 188
DAVIS TOMMY PILOTS 135
HANEY LARRY PILOTS 209
MORRIS JOHNNY PILOTS 111
OYLER RAY PILOTS 178
BUNNING JIM PIRATES 175
CANNIZZARO CHRIS PIRATES 131
PAGAN JOSE PIRATES 192
SISK TOMMIE PIRATES 152
LAHOUD JOE RED SOX 189
PETROCELLI RICO RED SOX 215
STANGE LEE RED SOX 148
THIBDEAU JOHN RED SOX 189
YASTRZEMSKI CARL RED SOX 130
ARRIGO GERRY REDS 213
ROSE PETE REDS 120
WAGNER LEON REDS 187
WOODWARD WOODY REDS 142
ADAIR JERRY ROYALS 159
BUNKER WALLY ROYALS 137
HARRISON CHUCK ROYALS 116
BALDWIN DAVE SENATORS 132
BRINKMAN ED SENATORS 153
FRENCH JIM SENATORS 199
HOWARD FRANK SENATORS 170
WORLD SERIES GAME 4 SPECIAL-WS 165
WORLD SERIES GAME 3 SPECIAL-WS 164
WORLD SERIES GAME 7 SPECIAL-WS 168
WORLD SERIES GAME 2 SPECIAL-WS 163
WORLD SERIES GAME 1 SPECIAL-WS 162
WORLD SERIES SUMMARY SPECIAL-WS 169
WORLD SERIES GAME 5 SPECIAL-WS 166
FACE ROY TIGERS 207
HORTON WILLIE TIGERS 180
McLAIN DENNY TIGERS 150
TRACEWSKI DICK TIGERS 126
GRZENDA JOE TWINS 121
PERRY JIM TWINS 146
ROSEBORO JOHN TWINS 218
UHLAENDER TED TWINS 194
CHRISTIAN BOB WHITE SOX 173
NYMAN GERRY WHITE SOX 173
PAVLETICH DON WHITE SOX 179
WOOD WILBUR WHITE SOX 123
CLOSTER ALAN YANKEES 114
CUMBERLAND JOHN YANKEES 114
McDANIEL LINDY YANKEES 191



EDIT 4/17/16: A further tip of the cap to Keith Olbermann, who pointed put the first version of this post had Dalrymple shown with the wrong team on the Mini Stickers. His catch has helped tighten up this post considerably.